90 Day Goals > 365 Day Goals

Most people who set New Year’s resolutions don’t follow through on them.

Annual business goals often fall by the wayside as well. Consequently, late December brings a crush of articles on why we fail, and how we might reform the process to boost success. Among the best suggestions I’ve heard lately? Forget year-long resolutions and focus on 90-day goals. Several small business owners who tried this over the past year as part of an accountability group they participated in explained to me why this tweak helped their businesses, and lives.

1. 90 days isn’t too long

Life changes a lot in a year, especially if you work at a startup. Goals set annually may not feel relevant in 12 months. Or 12 months seems so far away that you figure you can always start tomorrow. Ninety days, on the other hand, is about “holding me accountable to my long range goals, but in smaller chunks, so I actually see an end in sight,” says Marni Beninger, who owns Mountain Waters Spa and Wellness in British Columbia. She set a 90-day goal to raise revenue by $5,000/month, saw what it took to meet it, and then set another 90-day goal to raise revenue by another $10,000/month. That involved hiring a sales person, but now that she knows that, she might aim for another $15,000/month over the next 90 days. That would put her $30,000/month over where she started, all in doable chunks.

2. 90 days isn’t too short, either

Of course, the day-to-day nature of startup life means it’s easy to get stuck in the weeds. When Beninger first tried to set quarterly goals, she realized that this was a challenge she faced. “The first time it was just basically a to-do list,” she said, with 50 items on it. “It’s really hard to come out of that mindset of working in your business.” But she soon figured out what made a good mid-range goal: one that involved looking just far enough into the future to challenge herself, but be achievable.

3. You can reset quickly

When we give up on New Year’s resolutions, it’s easy to let ourselves wait until next January to try again. Ninety day goals offer a quicker option. Victoria Lynden, who founded Kohana Coffee in Austin, Texas, says that “In 90 days, if I’m going to fail, I’m going to fail fast.” One example: she wanted to enter the Canadian market, but after setting that as a 90-day goal, figured out that getting the proper organic certifications could be a two-year process. The take-away? Do more research, and figure out other international markets that are easier to enter. “I have succeeded through my failures,” she says.

4. You don’t spread yourself thin

You may have lots of goals, and that’s a good thing. Giving yourself 90 days means you can focus on a few at a time, knowing that there’s another 90-day period coming up soon. Maybe during the first quarter you focus on launching a new product. Then in the second quarter you focus on finding a new and bigger space. At the end of six months, you’ll have the new product and the bigger space, whereas if you aimed to do both at once, you might get overwhelmed and figure out neither. “As an entrepreneur, you always go in a lot of different directions,” says Lynden. “This, to me, is like having a map that charts my course.”

5. You can make personal goals part of the mix

The good thing about setting two to three goals four times per year is that this gives you space to think about all spheres of life. Rachel Hofstetter owns Guesterly, a startup that specializes in directories for events. Like many entrepreneurs, she finds it hard to take a vacation, and so she made taking a week-long December holiday one of her 90-day goals. When I sent her an email on a December Friday asking to chat the next week, she insisted on getting on the phone right then, since she was on the plane for Mexico the next morning and planned to unplug. “Without that part of my plan, it wouldn’t be my utmost focus,” she says. But as one of her big goals for the quarter, she was determined to make it happen.

Stay current with Smartbrief!

Have you signed up for Community Association Management SmartBrief yet? CAMICB provides a free, weekly e-mail newsbrief specifically designed for community association managers. Sign up here.

This complimentary resource is aimed at bringing you a quick, two-minute read that will help you keep up-to-date with the latest news and trends in our profession. SmartBrief will provide short summaries of the news articles that will be of interest to you as a community association manager. We know it will save you time, keep you informed and add to your success. I hope you will subscribe.

Here’s what you missed this week:smartbrief

Colorado construction-defects law may be reformed in 2015 A Colorado law that allows HOA boards to decide whether to sue over construction defects and reject fixes by homebuilders could be reformed in 2015. The law is necessary to protect condo owners, said Nancy Stockton, president of the homeowners association at the Vallagio at Inverness in Arapahoe County. “I think (reforming the law) would be a license for builders to cut corners and be even more lax in their construction,” says Stockton. “The dispute process is already onerous.” The Denver Post (1/4)

Mixed-use neighborhoods attract ex-suburbanites Mixed-use neighborhoods where hotels, condos, offices and shops all thrive in concert with one another are becoming more popular as the American dream slowly shifts away from the popular suburbs of yesteryear. Millennials and Baby Boomers alike are flocking to these new projects that are being built in many major and minor cities. The Tampa Tribune (Fla.) (1/4)

Association manager can’t preside over meetings Association managers are not permitted to conduct HOA board members’ responsibilities and can leave the board in a risky situation if allowed to run the organization. “[I]ndemnification may be negated, depending on the terms of insurance, business conducted during all those meetings may be void and, in the event of a lawsuit, the association would be at a disadvantage, if not handicapped, in proving the board members acted in good faith and in the best interests of the association and its titleholders,” write attorneys Donie Vanitzian and Zachary Levine. Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model) (1/4)

CMCA Recertification

CAMICB sent reminder notices this week to individuals who need to recertify and/or pay their annual service fee by April 1, 2015. Here are a few helpful links:

A few things to note:

1. It is the responsibility of each CMCA to provide documentation of their 16 hours of continuing education at the time of recertification. CAMICB does not track your CEs. If you took a class with CAI, please log into their website (caionline.org) to print out a certificate of completion.

2. Only courses completed between April 1, 2013 and April 1, 2015 present will count as continuing education.

3. If you have held an active AMS, PCAM, FL CAM, NV CAM or NAHC-RCM for at least a year, this will satisfy your CMCA continuing education requirement.

4. Credit hours may be earned only for education that meets either of the following criteria: It pertains to community association operations or management and/or it contributes to the professional development of the CMCA.

5. The CMCA Annual Service Fee is $105.00. Oftentimes this fee is confused with CAI’s individual manager membership. Recently, CAI increased the rate of the individual manager membership from $130.00 to $134.00. While CAMICB maintains an affiliate relationship with CAI, we are an independent credentialing body: separately incorporated, governed by an independent Board of Trustees, and guided in the administration of our program by the standards of our accrediting body, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies. We are not a membership organization; we do not collect membership dues. We assess our credential holders an annual maintenance fee which is used to support the development and delivery of our core exam and the operation of our program in accordance with best practices in professional credentialing.

Roland Richardson, Certification Assistant, is happy to assist you with the recertification process. Contact Roland at rrichardson@camicb.org with any questions.

Directory of Credentialed Professionals

CAMICB is proud to announce the new and improved Directory of Credential Professionals at: https://www.camicb.org/find-a-cmca.  CMCAs are automatically listed in the Directory of Credentialed Professionals when they achieve certification.

The new Directory lists your CMCA recertification and billing dates as well as your contact information.  You can use the Directory to see if your CMCA certification is current or up for renewal.  Homeowners and management companies will also use the Directory to find CMCAs in their area.

The Directory is searchable by many fields: last name, first name, organization and location.  Results can then be sorted by column and further filtered by the state selection on the right.

CAMICB has also included your CAI designations in the search for your convenience.

If you’d like to be removed from the Directory of Credentialed Professionals or your information needs updating, please email us at info@camicb.org.

Be Intentional About Leadership

By Mary Jo Asmus

Many leaders put as much effort into defining how they want to “show up” as they would in buying a new refrigerator. In fact, some may give their leadership skills even less thought. These mindless leaders react to whatever captures their attention and desire in the moment, but don’t stop to think about their impact or how they want others to remember them when they are no longer around.

Being intentional about how you lead is hard work, but in a way it’s no different than learning to play the piano or getting better at your golf swing. It requires you to look to a future goal (“I want to be a concert pianist”; “I want to be able to compete at golf”; “I want to increase my level of influence”). You have to be diligent and work hard at practicing with deliberate action steps that are focused on the nuances of your strengths and gaps.

It takes courage, fortitude, and resolve to be intentional in your work as a leader. It requires risk, failure and the ability to pick yourself back up and go at it again.

The hard work is worth your efforts. The gifts that come back to you when you’re intentional are results and a legacy that others remember. You’ll create a world that is better than when you entered it.

To start you on your journey of intentionality:
Be visionary. This is what Stephen Covey called “begin with the end in mind.” Consider the following questions: What will it look like when you’re at your best as a leader? How will others describe you and the impact you made on them? What will they remember you for? No matter what you do and how you do it, you’ll leave a legacy. Why not make it one that you’ve crafted and been intentional about? Write it down. Revise it. Ask others what they think about it. But do have a personal leadership vision.

Be driven by your values. What values do you stand for? Knowing what principles and beliefs are important to you provides an anchor when it comes time to make tough decisions or take difficult action. Spend some time thinking about what’s important to you and what things you won’t compromise on. You can work with a mentor or coach on this, or you might already have an idea of what’s most important to you. Write down your top three to five values. Carry them with you or memorize them. They will be an important tool to help you become and stay a great leader.

Be courageous. It takes courage to follow a vision and to stand true to your values. Are you ready for the conflict it may cause? How will you react when you’re criticized for decisions you make based on your values? How will you respond to those who disagree? A personal vision and values sometimes requires you to follow the road less traveled, which isn’t always considered an asset in the business world. Make sure that your resolve is strong as it will only make you a better, more confident leader.

Be reflective on your progress at becoming more intentional. Refer to your personal vision and values regularly as you consider if you are on the path or straying from them. What steps are you taking to assure that your vision and values become incorporated into your daily routine? What happens when your daily routine blows up and you are under stress (do you revert to reacting rather than being intentional?). Who can help you stay true to what matters to you?

Being intentional about your leadership is a best practice for making incremental improvements in the way you lead. Start with vision, values, courage and reflection, and you are on your way toward becoming the best.

Mary Jo Asmus is an executive coach and a recovering corporate executive who has spent the past 12 years as president of Aspire Collaborative Services, an executive-coaching firm that manages Fortune 500 corporate-coaching initiatives and coaches leaders to prepare them for bigger and better things.

CMCA Recertification

CAMICB sent reminder notices this week to individuals who need to recertify and/or pay their annual service fee by October 1, 2014. Here are a few helpful links:

A few things to note:

1. It is the responsibility of each CMCA to provide documentation of their 16 hours of continuing education at the time of recertification. CAMICB does not track your CEs. If you took a class with CAI, please log into their website (caionline.org) to print out a certificate of completion.

2. Only courses completed between October 1, 2012 and October 1, 2014 present will count as continuing education.

3. If you have held an active AMS, PCAM, FL CAM, NV CAM or NAHC-RCM for at least a year, this will satisfy your CMCA continuing education requirement.

4. Credit hours may be earned only for education that meets either of the following criteria: It pertains to community association operations or management and/or it contributes to the professional development of the CMCA.

5. The CMCA Annual Service Fee is $105.00. Oftentimes this fee is confused with CAI’s individual manager membership. Recently, CAI increased the rate of the individual manager membership from $130.00 to $134.00. While CAMICB maintains an affiliate relationship with CAI, we are an independent credentialing body: separately incorporated, governed by an independent Board of Trustees, and guided in the administration of our program by the standards of our accrediting body, the National Commission for Certifying Agencies. We are not a membership organization; we do not collect membership dues. We assess our credential holders an annual maintenance fee which is used to support the development and delivery of our core exam and the operation of our program in accordance with best practices in professional credentialing.

Roland Richardson, Certification Assistant, is happy to assist you with the recertification process. Contact Roland at rrichardson@camicb.org with any questions.

In The News: Rising Mortgage Rates Lead to Lower Sales

From HuffingtonPost

For 30 years, falling mortgage interest rates have enabled homeowners to move into ever-larger homes on the promise of ever-cheaper financing. But that party is over, and the impact on existing home sales could be significant.

After peaking at more than 18 percent in 1981, rates on a 30-year, fixed mortgage fell steadily, bottoming at 3.3 percent in late 2012, according to Freddie Mac. Rates then jumped into the mid-4 percent range before retreating more recently. Nobody expects rates in the teens again, but rates in the 5 percent and 6 percent range are no longer out of sight.

Housing was relatively simple as rates fell. When I first bought a home, I had a mortgage rate of about 8 percent. A few years later, when I re-entered the market, I qualified for a rate of about 5 percent. With this lower rate, I had a choice: I could buy a more expensive and larger home, but still pay roughly the same amount per month thanks to lower financing costs. Or I could buy a similarly priced home to the one I was currently in, and lower my monthly payment and pocket the savings.

And I wasn’t alone. Today’s currently very low rates are helping to boost existing home sales volume by roughly 15 percent, according to Zillow research. This effect has acted as a tailwind for decades, helping millions of homeowners move up the chain to bigger, more expensive homes.

But as rates rise, the script flips. Higher rates will discourage or disqualify some potential future buyers that may have otherwise entered the market when rates were lower. And thanks to a furious refinancing push by lenders and a sense that low interest rates couldn’t last forever, millions of current homeowners are now locked in at mortgage rates close to or at historic lows.

It remains to be seen whether homeowners locked in at today’s low rates will be willing or able to buy again later when rates could be almost double what they were even a year ago. Instead of paying the same amount each month for a larger home, some homeowners may be faced with the prospect of paying more per month for a home very similar to the one they’re already in. This is the phenomenon referred to as “mortgage rate lock.”

The Mortgage Bankers Association is currently predicting that rates on a 30-year, fixed rate mortgage will rise to 5.1 percent by mid-2015. If that happens, then mortgage rate lock will become a pronounced headwind for the housing market, reducing home sales by about 4 percent from current levels even after accounting for positive factors like modestly higher incomes and more households.

Still, many discount this problem, thinking that we will continue to enjoy very low rates for years to come. Admittedly, this doesn’t seem too far-fetched given the most recent data. But even in this more benign scenario, the simple fact that rates aren’t still falling will begin to create a drag on home sales as soon as autumn 2015 (representing 100,000 fewer sales by then, all other things being equal). This drag will have to be offset by higher than normal rates of income growth or much higher homeownership rates, neither of which seems very likely by that time.

The bottom line is this: For a generation, we’ve gotten used to falling mortgage rates and the boost they had on sales. Very low rates in recent years have done the heavy lifting we wanted them to do, namely helping to boost home sales from the depths of the recession. But whether rates rise quickly or not, it’s safe to say that they won’t continue falling over the long-term as they have for the past 30 years.

And as is always the case, there’s no free lunch. We’re about to get the check, not just for the recent very low rates, but for the 30-year-long buffet in which we’ve feasted on falling rates.

 

News Follow up: NYC to Ban ‘Poor Doors’ In Luxury Buildings

From Huffington Post

New York City officials are vowing to reverse a law allowing luxury developers to install two separate entrances in new residential towers — one for residents paying at market rate and another for low-income residents who qualify for affordable housing.

Such buildings include affordable housing units so that developers can receive tax credits.

“The two-door system, or creating a poor-door system as some media have coined it, is an affront to New Yorkers’ belief in fairness and diversity,” Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer said at a recent press conference. “Creating a two-tier system in a development that is receiving tax benefits is offensive.”

The outrage stems from news last week that the city approved a controversial dual entrance at 40 Riverside Boulevard, where developers have already begun constructing a luxury condo in which low-income residents will be segregated from wealthier residents. Those who will live in the lower-income part of the building will be prohibited from using amenities including a gym and swimming pool.

Extell, the developer behind the Riverside Boulevard project, has since defended the housing design.

“Would you rather not have the affordable housing? Ask any one of the thousands of people who are applying for that, and they don’t give a damn,” Extell president Gary Barnett told NPR. “They want to have a beautiful apartment, in a beautiful neighborhood, and you know, at a super price.”

The poor door practice, which is technically permitted due to zoning codes created to spur more affordable housing units under former Mayor Michael Bloomberg (I), is common throughout buildings across the city.

Mayor Bill de Blasio (D) was quick to put blame on his predecessor for the loophole, even though he voted for the measure in 2009 when he was a city council member.

Lawmakers including Councilman Mark Levine are now drafting legislation to close the loophole in the city’s Inclusionary Housing Zoning system.

“It’s outrageous that we give huge tax credits to developers for including affordable apartments in their buildings only to allow them to turn around and segregate entrances or block access to amenities for low-income tenants,” Levine said. “I am profoundly disappointed that the developer of 40 Riverside has exploited this loophole in creating a ‘poor door’ in its building. We must do everything we can to end this discriminatory practice immediately.”

Cvil rights groups are also working to end the practice, which they say inherently discriminates against minorities who make up a large portion of residents qualifying for affordable housing.

A New York University study cited in the Times noted in 2011, 73.4 percent of market-rate residents were white. Seventy-seven percent of owners were also white.

A petition demanding change was also launched.

“Our goal is to continue to fight, to do what we need to do and make it right,” Elzora Cleveland, who started the petition, explained. “It’s just not right, it’s not right.”